Update: Why Kids Call Home: Laundry

I must add — it’s not just boys. Moms of girls get the same calls.  Even the girl who is majoring in fashion merchandising came home with her bag full of laundry, and as she watched her mother get to work, said, “That’s cute how you sort them by color.”

The calls have been rolling in the evening — typically on a weekend night. They have one common theme: “How can I tell if it’s too full?”  “Is it OK to put me jeans in with the towels.” “What temperature should I pick?” We, meanwhile, have been biding our time at home, wanting to text and call, but holding back, trying to give them our independence. We are elated when our phones light up telling us he’s calling. They need help.They are in distress.  Yes, we trained them before they left, but the washing and drying machines are different, the look different, the controls are in a different place, and they use different words, (hence the question, “Mom, what are delicates?”). They’re in a different environment, and they are confused. Which might explain the one son, who realized, after he added the detergent, and closed the door and hit start — that he started with the dryer first.

So, this is how the flood gates of communication between college student and mom begins — with the laundry questions. And this is how it will continue, for the rest of our days. Moms serve as the google search bar, as we are just a phone call and a text away, answering questions from “Can you cook Ramen noodles in the microwave?” and “It’s 2 am and I can’t stop coughing.”

Some things, we’re better off “not” knowing. The bed sheets, for example. The maker of Simple Sheets found that College students only change their sheets 3x per year. Lazy? Yes. Without questions. But think about it — remember how hard it is to get to that back corner of a bunk/lofted bed? Sometimes the elastic just grabs that corner and will not come off. So, following the path of least resistance, they simply forget about it and sleep on the sheets for another week or more.
Simple Sheets™Â makes it possible for the college student to get that fitted sheet off and back on.  They use Velcro. So, once you get that base sheet on — it’s on for the year. The top of the fitted base sheet is cut out — leaving edges of Velcro all around the edges, so that the “top” of the fitted sheet is simply attached via the Velcro. To wash these sheets, you simply strip off the sheet from the Velcro — leaving the elastic in place, so that you can throw them into that overly-stuffed washer. Plus, the sheets include the bedside pocket – perfect for storing keeping their IPhone, headphones, calculator and pencils in place.
The best way to explain it is to show it — here’s a photo:

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Genius.

The fabric feels like cotton — but it’s not, they are hypo-allergenic — and  wrinkle free. The manufacturers say that fabric is comparable to a 1500 thread count cotton fabric — but they’re wrinkle free.  They’re actually quite soft.

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So, here’s the deal. I know you’re always looking for something to put into those care packages you send to your kids. So, I’m giving away a $50 Vanilla Gift card to put into your next college car package. The card is safer than cash,  and safer than cash, and exactly what your college student needs.

To enter in this giveaway, leave me a comment about the question either you as a college student, or your current college student, called Mom about.
Sweepstakes Rules:

You may receive (6) total entries by selecting from the following entry methods:

  1. Leave a comment in response to the sweepstakes prompt on this post
  2. Post about this promotion, including exactly the following unique term in your update message: “#SweepstakesEntry”; and leave the URL to that Facebook update in a comment on this post Follow Susiej on Facebook
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  6. Blog about this promotion, including a disclosure that you are receiving a sweepstakes entry in exchange for writing the blog post, and leave the URL to that post in a comment on this post

This giveaway is open to US and Canadian Residents age 18 or older and ends November 28, 2014 at 11 pm EST. Winners will be selected via random draw, and will be notified by e-mail. You will have 72 hours to respond; otherwise a new winner will be selected.

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107 comments to “Update: Why Kids Call Home: Laundry”
  1. I didn’t call home about laundry, since my mom taught me how to do it when I was 13 and never did it for me again after that….BUT. I did have to ask how the heck to wash dishes in a sink that wasn’t divided. I’d never seen a sink that way before, and washing dishes in it was a pain! Luckily, my mom is smarter than me and advised that I buy a dishwashing tub to seperate my dishes. Oh. I should have thought of that.

  2. So I don’t qualify but I don’t care :-). I am impressed by this innovation but I suspect it would make no difference to my stepsons. They don’t seem to notice grot, even when they’re sleeping in it. I think they get it from their father. He will say to me once every two weeks,”Oh, I love the feel of fresh sheets.”. Fascinating I say, why don’t you change them more often? It is official. I am grumpy.

  3. I used to call my mom to help me with my music theory homework. She was a classical pianist and always knew immediately how to help. I miss her. <3

  4. I honestly didn’t call home much for anything other than to periodically catch up (my older brother was in the hospital most of my freshman year and being in touch was very important). I do remember calling my junior year and asking what temperature to cook a turkey (and how long it needed to thaw) since we were having Thanksgiving part 1 at school before we all disbanded for the weekend.

  5. I usually called home when I needed something – usually money. I was across the country so laundry would have been a little hard. I am curious what my kids will call home for when they go off to college.

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