“Covered” at the Art Museum

Did I ever tell you about the time I almost invested $10,000 in my very own Chihuly Vase? After my fourth son was born, and he was still an infant, and my husband was out of town all weekend, and I was DETERMINED (I’m like that) not to let a sweet little baby stand in the way of the cultural activities I planned for my older children. So, I took them — all four boys, ages infant, 2, 5 and 8, to a Children’s Educational Program at the Art Museum. By myself. Our “assignment” was to copy a stained glass piece of art with tissue paper and glue. First, we had to go upstairs to the main museum exhibit area to view the Chihuly Glass sculptures. I carry one in a sling, and try my best to hold the hands of the 2 and 5, while reading the instructions of items that we’re supposed to “observe.” The 2 and 5 year olds start jumping around a little bit — maybe too much — and I realize, that there is an entire collection of Glass Chihuly Vases standing on glass podiums, uncased. Just sitting on top — nothing holding them. One bump, and nothing but shards of glass crystals. I realize, this could be my latest investment.
I then spot a security guard, looking over at us, talking on a radio, and his exact words were, “I’ve got em covered.” Then, I look around, and there are 4 more, hovering around us. One body guard for each one of us. I decide then, maybe it’s time to go back downstairs to the children’s area. We made our stained glass, covered with lots of glue, and went back home where we were safe again. susie

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3 comments on ““Covered” at the Art Museum
  1. We respectfully disagree. Art is a necessity. It isn’t dollar worth, no, but that it changes ones life and enhances existence in ways beyond words with the experience of seeing and being.

    Unfortunately, today, it is more about owning and guarding investment. That’s sort of like thinking of a beautiful child as an investment. These creations are wonders on the earth given to us to treasure and enjoy.

    Thanks, for giving us some soapbox time.
    Nanny Molly

  2. Pingback: When a Child Becomes a King | Susiej

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